Behavioral and Emotional Disorders in Adolescents

Nature, Assessment, and Treatment

Edited by David A. Wolfe and Eric J. Mash

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November 29, 2005
ISBN 9781593852252
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719 Pages
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Systematic, authoritative, and timely, this is an outstanding reference and text for anyone working with or studying adolescents. More than 50 leading experts comprehensively review current knowledge on adolescent externalizing disorders, internalizing disorders, developmental disorders, personality and health-related disorders, gender identity and sexual disorders, and maltreatment and trauma. Chapters identify the core features of each disorder; explore its etiology, course, and outcome; address diagnostic issues specific to adolescents; and describe effective assessment and treatment approaches. The book also provides an integrative conceptual framework for understanding both healthy and maladaptive adolescent development.

“The book is systematic, well laid out, and east to use and espouses an evidence-based model of adolescent mental health....Throughout, good summaries of recent quantitative research and theories are presented along with useful diagrams and models. Current controversies and issues are given space and social factors and their impact are considered....The book can provide comprehensive, theoretical and research-based information about particular mental health problems in adolescence, even for those who have little or no background knowledge.”

Counselling Children and Young People


“This excellent text edited by Wolfe and Mash brings the study of adolescent disorders to the forefront, by presenting the extant research on both assessment and treatment of behavioral and emotional difficulties in adolescence. This unique and well-organized text includes contributions from leading authorities in the field of adolescent psychopathology....This outstanding volume covers a range of behavioral and emotional disorders among adolescents. The authors provide pertinent information on assessment, diagnosis, prevention, and intervention, and they follow an integrative framework to conceptualize each disorder....Most of the authors in this text think creatively and outline ways the existing research can effectively inform the directions of future research. This well-written text covers a vast amount of empirically-based information and it should serve as a valuable resource for health professionals working with adolescents in medical centers, private practice, academic, and school settings. Furthermore, doctors specializing in pediatrics and family medicine could also benefit greatly from this text. Finally, this volume could be extremely useful for adolescent psychopathology courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels.”

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Book Reviews


“I am grateful to the authors for their timely, well-researched, and cohesive text....I really like this book. The authors have done a remarkable job of putting together a thought-provoking text that is a genuine contribution to helping all of us understand the complex, fast-changing world of adolescence.”

PsycCRITIQUES


“Unlike problems of early childhood, adolescent problems are frequently seen as already 'fixed' and too late to change. This volume repeatedly challenges this misconception. Key experts in the field thoroughly address current research on prevalent adolescent disorders and evaluate the evidence base for existing interventions. Going beyond typical texts, the chapters deal with how development and health interact over time to present both challenges and opportunities for change at this pivotal life stage. This is an excellent text for courses in adolescent psychopathology and abnormal psychology, particularly as it takes cutting-edge research concerns and grounds them effectively in existing knowledge.”

—Bonnie Leadbeater, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Canada


“Wolfe and Mash bring their professional and editorial expertise to this superb handbook. Within an integrative biopsychosocial framework, the outstanding contributors provide comprehensive coverage of adolescent disorders and interventions. Chapters effectively describe the state of knowledge about this unique and challenging period of development. This volume is a tour de force that is exceptionally grounded in research and well written for students as well as for fledgling and seasoned professionals.”

—Michael C. Roberts, PhD, Clinical Child Psychology Program, University of Kansas


“A scholarly, evidence-based, and up-to-date work. Written by a virtual 'who's who' of experts on adolescent mental health, each chapter reviews the latest research in a manner that is simultaneously accessible and practical. I highly recommend this book for students, practitioners, and researchers.”

—Robert E. Emery, PhD, Center for Children, Families, and the Law, and Department of Psychology, University of Virginia


“Knowledge and interest in psychopathology during adolescence is exploding, and this timely volume provides an excellent overview of this rapidly growing field. Chapters by a stellar group of authors systematically address state-of-the-art science and practice for a wide array of specific disorders and behavioral health problems faced by adolescents and their families and communities. An invaluable resource for clinicians, scholars, educators, and advanced students in diverse behavioral health disciplines.”

—Ann S. Masten, PhD, Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota


“Until fairly recently, adolescence was a relatively neglected period in developmental and clinical research: scholars tended to 'infer up' from childhood or 'infer down' from adulthood. This volume testifies to the changing state of the field. Its depth and breadth suggest that research on adolescent psychopathology and treatment has at last come of age. Wolfe and Mash have assembled an impressive group of experts in this excellent reference for developing and seasoned professionals alike. Would be a good choice as a text for graduate courses in adolescent psychopathology and treatment.”

—Sharon L. Foster, PhD, California School of Professional Psychology, Alliant International University

Table of Contents

I. Introduction

1. Behavioral and Emotional Problems in Adolescents: Overview and Issues, David A. Wolfe and Eric J. Mash

2. Development and Psychopathology in Adolescence, Grayson N. Holmbeck, Deborah Friedman, Mona Abad, and Barbara Jandasek

3. Interventions for Adolescent Psychopathology: Linking Treatment and Prevention, Jody Kamon, Patrick H. Tolan, and Deborah Gorman-Smith

II. Externalizing Disorders

4. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Russell A. Barkley

5. Conduct Problems, Robert J. McMahon and Julie S. Kotler

6. Substance Use Disorders, Sandra A. Brown and Ana M. Abrantes

III. Internalizing Disorders

7. Anxiety Disorders, Philip C. Kendall, Kristina A. Hedtke, and Sasha G. Aschenbrand

8. Mood Disorders, Karen D. Rudolph, Constance Hammen, and Shannon E. Daley

9. Suicidal and Nonsuicidal Self-Harm Behaviors, David B. Goldston, Stephanie Sergent Daniel, and Elizabeth Mayfield Arnold

IV. Developmental Disorders

10. Mental Retardation, Robert M. Hodapp, Ellie Kazemi, Beth A. Rosner, and Elisabeth M. Dykens

11. Learning Disabilities, Orly Lipka and Linda S. Siegel

12. Autism Spectrum Disorders, Steven G. Spector and Fred R. Volkmar

V. Personality and Health-Related Disorders

13. Personality Disorders, Jeffrey G. Johnson, Elizabeth Bromley, Robert F. Bornstein, and Joel R. Sneed

14. Eating Disorders, James Lock and Daniel le Grange

15. Health and Chronic Illness, Ronald T. Brown, Alexandra Boeving, Angela LaRosa, and Laura Arnstein Carpenter

VI. Gender Identity and Sexual Disorders

16. Gender Identity Disorder, Kenneth J. Zucker

17. Sexual Risk Behavior, Beth A. Kotchick, Lisa Armistead, and Rex L. Forehand

18. Deviant Sexual Behavior, Howard E. Barbaree and Calvin M. Langton

VII. Maltreatment and Trauma

19. Relationship Violence, Ernest N. Jouriles, David A. Wolfe, Edward Garrido, and Anna McCarthy

20. Abuse and Trauma, David A. Wolfe, Jennine S. Rawana, and Deborah Chiodo


About the Editors

David A. Wolfe, PhD, holds the RBC Chair in Children's Mental Health at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and is a Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Toronto. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and past president of Division 37 (Child, Youth, and Family Services). Dr. Wolfe has broad research and clinical interests in abnormal child and adolescent psychology, with a special focus on child abuse, domestic violence, and developmental psychopathology, and he has published widely on these topics. Dr. Wolfe is the 2005 recipient of the Donald O. Hebb award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology from the Canadian Psychological Association.

Eric J. Mash, PhD, is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Calgary and Affiliate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Oregon Health and Science University. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association and of the Society of Clinical Psychology, the Society for Child and Family Policy and Practice, the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, and the Society of Pediatric Psychology of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Mash is also a Fellow and Charter Member of the Association for Psychological Science. He has served as an editor, editorial board member, and editorial consultant for numerous journals and has published widely on child and adolescent psychopathology, assessment, and treatment.

Contributors

Mona Abad, MA, Graduate Clinical Psychology Program, Loyola University, Chicago, Illinois

Ana M. Abrantes, PhD, Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island

Lisa Armistead, PhD, Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia

Elizabeth Mayfield Arnold, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Sasha G. Aschenbrand, MA, Child and Adolescent Anxiety Disorders Clinic, Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Howard E. Barbaree, PhD, Law and Mental Health Program, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Russell A. Barkley, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, State University of New York Upstate Medical University at Syracuse, Syracuse, New York

Alexandra Boeving, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

Robert F. Bornstein, PhD, Department of Psychology, Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Elizabeth Bromley, MD, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York

Ronald T. Brown, PhD, Department of Public Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Sandra A. Brown, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California; Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California

Laura Arnstein Carpenter, PhD, Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

Deborah Chiodo, MA, MEd, Centre for Prevention Science, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, London, Ontario, Canada

Shannon E. Daley, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California

Stephanie Sergent Daniel, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Elisabeth M. Dykens, PhD, Department of Psychology and Human Development and Kennedy Center Institute, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee; Neuropsychiatric Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California

Rex L. Forehand, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont

Deborah Friedman, PhD, Graduate Clinical Psychology Program, Loyola University, Chicago, Illinois

Edward Garrido, PhD, Department of Psychology, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas

David B. Goldston, PhD, Duke Child and Family Study Center and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina

Deborah Gorman-Smith, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

Constance Hammen, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, California

Kristina A. Hedtke, MA, Child and Adolescent Anxiety Disorders Clinic, Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Robert M. Hodapp, PhD, Department of Special Education, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee

Grayson N. Holmbeck, PhD, Department of Psychology, Loyola University, Chicago, Illinois

Barbara Jandasek, MA, Graduate Clinical Psychology Program, Loyola University, Chicago, Illinois

Jeffrey G. Johnson, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York; New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York

Ernest N. Jouriles, PhD, Department of Psychology, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas

Jody Kamon, PhD, Treatment Research Center, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont

Ellie Kazemi, MA, Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles, California

Philip C. Kendall, PhD, Child and Adolescent Anxiety Disorders Clinic, Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Beth A. Kotchick, PhD, Department of Psychology, Loyola College, Baltimore, Maryland

Julie S. Kotler, MS, Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

Calvin M. Langton, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Angela LaRosa, MD, College of Health Professions, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

Daniel le Grange, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

Orly Lipka, PhD, Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology and Special Education, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

James Lock, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California

Eric J. Mash, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Anna McCarthy, MA, Department of Psychology, University of Houston, Houston, Texas

Robert J. McMahon, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

Jennine S. Rawana, PhD, Centre for Prevention Science, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, London, Ontario, Canada

Beth A. Rosner, Neuropsychiatric Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California

Karen D. Rudolph, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, Illinois

Linda S. Siegel, PhD, Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology and Special Education, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Joel R. Sneed, PhD, Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, New York

Steven G. Spector, MD, Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

Patrick H. Tolan, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Institute for Juvenile Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

Fred R. Volkmar, PhD, Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

David A. Wolfe, PhD, Centre for Prevention Science, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, London, Ontario, Canada; Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Faculty of Education, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

Kenneth J. Zucker, PhD, Child, Youth, and Family Program, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Audience

Practitioners, students, and researchers in child and adolescent clinical psychology, school psychology, child and adolescent psychiatry, clinical social work, and related fields.

Course Use

Serves as a text in graduate-level courses.