Developmental Motor Disorders

A Neuropsychological Perspective

Edited by Deborah Dewey and David E. Tupper

Hardcover
Hardcover
September 21, 2004
ISBN 9781593850647
Price: $92.00
501 Pages
Size: 7" x 10"
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Bringing together leading experts—and providing vital insights to guide clinical practice—this is the first volume to comprehensively address childhood motor disorders from a neuropsychological perspective. The book explores the neural and behavioral bases of movement disorders and summarizes current findings from applied research. Existing approaches to assessment and neuroimaging are critically examined, and new and innovative methods presented. Authors also synthesize the latest knowledge on motor difficulties associated with specific developmental and neurological problems: cerebral palsy; neuromuscular disease; autism; brain injury; disorders of coordination, speech, and written language; and more. Other important topics covered include psychosocial effects of motor skills impairments, frequently encountered comorbidities, and the status of available intervention approaches.

“This book is thorough, thoughtful, and uniquely useful in the questions it asks and attempts to answer....In this volume, Drs. Dewey and Tupper have made a signal contribution to our understanding of the causes, impact, and treatment of motor disorders, and, more broadly, the role of motor assessment in pediatric neuropsychological practice.”

Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society


“This book is thorough, thoughtful, and uniquely useful in the questions it asks and attempts to answer....In this volume, Drs. Dewey and Tupper have made a signal contribution to our understanding of the causes, impact, and treatment of motor disorders, and, more broadly, the role of motor assessment in pediatric neuropsychological practice.”

Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society


“Presenting a highly informative volume that addresses diverse aspects of developmental motor disorders, the editors have done justice to the considerable complexity of this topic. Authors provide clinically relevant discussions of a wide range of disorders, comorbidities, assessment instruments, and management approaches. They also describe methodologies for analysis of neuromotor deficits, show how these deficits are fundamental to understanding the biological bases of the disorders in which they are embedded, and highlight theoretical formulations. This book is clearly a 'consciousness raiser' with regard to the significance of motor status for both clinical care and research. Richly referenced and including contributions from experts from several disciplines, the volume will serve as both a source of current knowledge and a catalyst for further investigation.”

—H. Gerry Taylor, PhD, Department of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University and Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital


“This is perhaps the most comprehensive review of developmental motor disorders yet published, and one that will be of interest to the wide range of therapists, medical professionals, and educators who share an interest in this area. The knowledge and expertise of the contributing authors is outstanding. Every chapter covers the most exciting new research in the field, and could be used as a stand-alone review of the topic at hand. Taken as a whole, the volume provides a complete overview of the theoretical and practical problems to be solved if we are to find the best ways of helping children with movement disorders to move with fluency and ease. I could easily see this book serving as a core text within graduate programs that include coursework on motor development or disorders.”

—Sheila Henderson, PhD, Institute of Education, University of London, UK

Table of Contents

I. Foundations

1. Motor Disorders and Neuropsychological Development: A Historical Appreciation, David E. Tupper and Sandra K. Sondell

2. Neuroimaging of Developmental Motor Disorders, Deborah Dewey and Shauna Bottos

3. Approaches to Understanding the Neurobehavioral Mechanisms Associated with Motor Impairments in Children, Eric A. Roy, Shauna Bottos, Kelly Pryde, and Deborah Dewey

4. Motor Proficiency Assessment Batteries, Anna Barnett and Judith M. Peters

II. Clinical Disorders

5. Neurodevelopmental Motor Disorders: Cerebral Palsy and Neuromuscular Diseases, Thomas A. Blondis

6. Motor Disorders in Children with Intellectual Disabilities, Digby Elliott and Lindsay Bunn

7. Motor Problems in Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders, Isabel M. Smith

8. Acquired Childhood Conditions with Associated Motor Impairments, Deborah Dewey, Shauna Bottos, and David E. Tupper

9. Involuntary Motor Disorders in Childhood, Deborah Dewey, David E. Tupper, and Shauna Bottos

10. Balance and Postural Control across the Lifespan, Harriet G. Williams and Laura Ho

III. Neuropsychological Manifestations

11. Developmental Phonological Disorder, Megan M. Hodge and Leslie Wellman

12. Developmental Motor Learning Disability: A Neuropsychological Approach, Timo A. Ahonen, Libbe Kooistra, Helena Viholainen, and Marja H. Cantell

13. Visuospatial, Kinesthetic, Visuomotor Integration, and Visuoconstructional Disorders: Implications for Motor Development, Peter H. Wilson

14. Processing Deficits in Children with Movement and Attention Problems, Jan Piek and Thelma Pitcher

15. Understanding the "Graphia" in Developmental Dysgraphia: A Developmental Neuropsychological Perspective for Disorders in Producing Written Language, Virginia Berninger

IV. Issues and Applications

16. Hand Preference, Manual Asymmetry, and Manual Skill, Merrill Hiscock and Lynn Chapieski

17. Constraints in Neuromotor Development, Reint H. Geuze

18. Co-occurrence of Motor Disorders with Other Childhood Disorders, Deborah Dewey, Susan G. Crawford, Brenda N. Wilson, and Bonnie J. Kaplan

19. Psychosocial Functions of Children and Adolescents with Movement Disorders, Motohide Miyahara and Bryant J. Cratty

20. Implications of Movement Difficulties for Social Interaction, Physical Activity, Play, and Sports, Dawne Larkin and Janet Summers

21. Approaches to the Management of Children with Motor Problems, Helene J. Polatajko,

Sylvia Rodger, Ameet Dhillon, and Farrah Hirji


About the Editors

Deborah Dewey, PhD, is a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Investigator and an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Calgary. She is also a member of the Behavioural Research Unit at Alberta Children’s Hospital. Dr. Dewey is on the editorial board of Developmental Neuropsychology and has served as a grant reviewer for Canadian and international funding agencies. She is actively involved in grant-funded research on the neurobehavioral outcomes associated with developmental coordination disorder, learning disabilities, autism spectrum disorders, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, as well as the developmental outcomes of infants with very low birth weight. Dr. Dewey’s research interests also encompass pediatric health psychology issues such as family adjustment to chronic disease and physical activity in preschool-age children.

David E. Tupper, PhD, a board-certified neuropsychologist, is Director of the Neuropsychology Section at Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis and is Associate Professor of Neurology at the University of Minnesota Medical School. He is coauthor or editor of several books, including Soft Neurological Signs, The Neuropsychology of Everyday Life, and Human Developmental Neuropsychology, and is series editor for the Plenum Series in Russian Neuropsychology. Dr. Tupper’s clinical and research interests include neuropsychological aspects of motor disorders in children, cross-cultural neuropsychological assessment, and lifespan developmental neuropsychology.

Contributors

Timo Ahonen, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Jyväskylä, Finland

Anna Barnett, PhD, Department of Experimental Psychology, Oxford University, UK, and School of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, UK

Virginia Berninger, EdD, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Thomas A. Blondis, MD, Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago School of Medicine, Chicago, IL

Shauna Bottos, BS, Behavioural Research Unit, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Lindsay Bunn, MS, Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

Marja H. Cantell, PhD, Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, and Behavioural Research Unit, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Lynn Chapieski, PhD, Blue Bird Clinic for Pediatric Neurology, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX

Bryant J. Cratty, EdD, Department of Physiological Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA

Susan G. Crawford, MS, Behavioural Research Unit, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Canada

Deborah Dewey, PhD, Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, and Behavioural Research Unit, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Canada

Ameet Dhillon, BS, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Digby Elliott, PhD, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Reint H. Geuze, PhD, Department of Psychology, Developmental and Clinical Neuropsychology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Farrah Hirji, BS, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Merrill Hiscock, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Houston, Houston, TX

Laura Ho, MS, Perceptual-Motor Development Laboratory, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

Megan M. Hodge, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada

Bonnie J. Kaplan, PhD, Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary and Behavioural Research Unit, Alberta Children's Hospital, Alberta, Canada

Libbe Kooistra, PhD, Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary and Behavioural Research Unit, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Canada

Dawne Larkin, PhD, School of Human Movement and Exercise Science, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Australia

Motohide Miyahara, PhD, School of Physical Education, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

Judith M. Peters, MS, Department of Physiotherapy, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children and School of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, UK

Jan Piek, PhD, School of Psychology, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia

Thelma Pitcher, PhD, School of Psychology, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia

Helene J. Polatajko, PhD, OT, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Kelly Pryde, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

Eric A. Roy, PhD, Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

Sylvia Rodger, PhD, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

Isabel M. Smith, PhD, Departments of Pediatrics and Psychology, Dalhousie University and Psychological Services, IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

Sandra K. Sondell, PhD, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN

Janet Summers, PhD (deceased), School of Occupational Therapy, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia

David E. Tupper, PhD, Department of Neuropsychology, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN and Neurology

Department, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN

Helena Viholainen, MEd, Department of Special Education, University of Jyväskylä, Finland

Leslie Wellman, MS, Department of Communication Disorders, Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Harriet G. Williams, PhD, Perceptual-Motor Development Laboratory, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

Brenda N. Wilson, PhD, Behavioural Research Unit, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Canada

Peter H. Wilson, PhD, Department of Psychology and Disability Studies, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia

Audience

Pediatric neuropsychologists; pediatric neurologists; special educators; developmental psychologists; child psychiatrists; pediatricians; kinesiologists; physical, occupational, and speech-language therapists; students and residents in these areas.

Course Use

May serve as a text in graduate-level courses.