Multicultural and Multilingual Literacy and Language

Contexts and Practices

Edited by Fenice B. Boyd, Cynthia H. Brock, and Mary S. Rozendal

Paperback
Paperback
December 17, 2003
ISBN 9781572309616
Price: $39.00
338 Pages
Size: 6" x 9"
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Within a clear conceptual framework, this book explores ways that teachers, reading specialists, administrators, and teacher educators can provide more effective literacy instruction to K-9 students from diverse ethnic, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds. Cutting-edge theory and research is interwoven with detailed case studies that bring to life the complexities of teaching in today's multicultural and multilingual classroom. Topics covered include:

“I can't recall the last time I read an edited volume with so much fresh, new, and important material! I found myself marking chapters to cite as references, to recommend to colleagues, and to assign for graduate courses in literacy and diversity. Chapters reach from the individual learner in the classroom to the implications of state and district policy. Boyd, Brock, and Rozendal are to be congratulated for a book that is thoroughly ambitious in scope, truly multicultural in flavor, and successful in providing much-needed insights about the challenging issues of bringing students of diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds to high levels of literacy.”

—Kathryn H. Au, PhD, College of Education, University of Hawaii


“This volume is a major contribution to understanding the influences of children's culture and language on their literacy learning. The book raises awareness of issues related to literacy learning both in and out of school. College literacy instructors seeking to infuse their courses with knowledge about literacy learning in diverse settings will find it an essential text. Teachers will also benefit from reading this book: It will enhance their understanding of the different contributions of home and community to literacy learning, and help them create learning environments that promote all children's success.”

—Flora V. Rodriguez-Brown, PhD, College of Education, University of Illinois at Chicago


“This book brings both depth and breadth to its exploration of issues in supporting English language-learners. Topics addressed include approaches to word study, text selection, and instructional systems (both within the classroom and across the district). The voices of classroom teachers, teacher educators, and educational researchers provide a broad perspective on how to better address the needs of English-language learners through teacher preparation, teaching, and research. This is a useful resource for language and literacy educators, regardless of the settings in which they work.”

—Taffy E. Raphael, PhD, College of Education, University of Illinois-Chicago


“Literacy is a human right. Life success depends a great deal on the individual's access to information and literacy competence. This book provides a framework for including a community agenda in research and practice related to literacy instruction for multicultural/multilingual populations. It stresses that literacy is acquired in multiple contexts and is learned through a lifelong process. Also emphasized is the need for researchers, educators, and administrators to work together to create optimal learning environments and experiences for all children. If we truly want to leave no child behind, this book is a ‘must' for educators and other members of our global village.”

—Li-Rong L. Cheng, PhD, School of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, San Diego State University

Table of Contents

I. Basic Map and Tools for Finding Mental Health Information Online

1. Why and How to Look Online

2. Knowing Where to Look Online

II. Getting Answers to Your Professional Questions

3. Finding Disorders, Subspecialities, Clinical, and Treatment Information Online

4. Locating Employment Opportunities through the Web

5. Online Education and Continuing Education Resources

6. Networking with Other Professionals Online

7. Researching Online: References and Databases

8. Professional Associations, Issues, and Ethics Online

9. Book Publishers, Bookstores, and Journals Online

10. Finding and Downloading Software Online

11. Online Therapy (E-Therapy) and Behavior

III. Patient Education Resources

12. General Consumer-Oriented Resources on the Web

13. Online Consumer Discussion and Support Groups

IV. Appendices

A. Glossary of Terms

B. Further Reading

C. How to Get Online

D. Creating Your Own Web ResourceI. Basic Map and Tools for Finding MI. Basic Map and Tools for Finding Mental Health Information Online

1. Why and How to Look Online

2. Knowing Where to Look Online

II. Getting Answers to Your Professional Questions

3. Finding Disorders, Subspecialities, Clinical, and Treatment Information Online

4. Locating Employment Opportunities through the Web

5. Online Education and Continuing Education Resources

6. Networking with Other Professionals Online

7. Researching Online: References and Databases

8. Professional Associations, Issues, and Ethics Online

9. Book Publishers, Bookstores, and Journals Online

10. Finding and Downloading Software Online

11. Online Therapy (E-Therapy) and Behavior

III. Patient Education Resources

12. General Consumer-Oriented Resources on the Web

13. Online Consumer Discussion and Support Groups

IV. Appendices

A. Glossary of Terms

B. Further Reading

C. How to Get Online

D. Creating Your Own Web Resourceental Health Information Online

1. Why and How to Look Online

2. Knowing Where to Look Online

II. Getting Answers to Your Professional Questions

3. Finding Disorders, Subspecialities, Clinical, and Treatment Information Online

4. Locating Employment Opportunities through the Web

5. Online Education and Continuing Education Resources

6. Networking with Other Professionals Online

7. Researching Online: References and Databases

8. Professional Associations, Issues, and Ethics Online

9. Book Publishers, Bookstores, and Journals Online

10. Finding and Downloading Software Online

11. Online Therapy (E-Therapy) and Behavior

III. Patient Education Resources

12. General Consumer-Oriented Resources on the Web

13. Online Consumer Discussion and Support Groups

IV. Appendices

A. Glossary of Terms

B. Further Reading

C. How to Get Online

I. Basic Map and Tools for Finding Mental Health Information Online

1. Why and How to Look Online

2. Knowing Where to Look Online

II. Getting Answers to Your Professional Questions

3. Finding Disorders, Subspecialities, Clinical, and Treatment Information Online

4. Locating Employment Opportunities through the Web

5. Online Education and Continuing Education Resources

6. Networking with Other Professionals Online

7. Researching Online: References and Databases

8. Professional Associations, Issues, and Ethics Online

9. Book Publishers, Bookstores, and Journals Online

10. Finding and Downloading Software Online

11. Online Therapy (E-Therapy) and Behavior

III. Patient Education Resources

12. General Consumer-Oriented Resources on the Web

13. Online Consumer Discussion and Support Groups

IV. Appendices

A. Glossary of Terms

B. Further Reading

C. How to Get Online

D. Creating Your Own Web ResourceD. Creating Your Own Web Resource


About the Editors

Fenice B. Boyd, PhD, is Associate Professor of Literacy Education in the Department of Learning and Instruction at the University at Buffalo—State University of New York. She earned her doctorate from Michigan State University in Curriculum, Teaching, and Educational Policy with a speciality in Literacy. Dr. Boyd's research centers on adolescents who struggle with literacy learning and schooling, students' responses to young adult and multicultural literature, and issues related to diversity in classrooms. At the University at Buffalo, she teaches master's and doctoral courses focused on reading comprehension research; adolescent literacy; language arts; young adult literature; and language, literacy, and culture.

Cynthia H. Brock, PhD, is Associate Professor of Literacy Studies in the Department of Educational Specialties at the University of Nevada, Reno. Her primary teaching interests include literacy instruction for children in the middle and upper elementary grades, literacy and diversity, and qualitative methods. Dr. Brock's primary research interests include studying the literacy learning of upper elementary children from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. She also explores how to work with preservice and inservice teachers to foster the literacy learning of children from diverse backgrounds at the upper elementary level.

Mary S. Rozendal, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Literacy Education in the Department of Learning and Instruction at the University at Buffalo — State University of New York. She teaches literacy methods courses that center on instruction for students with disabilities, teacher collaboration in general and special education, and classroom discourse.

Contributors

Martha A. Adler, PhD, School of Education, University of Michigan, Dearborn, MI

Nancy Anderson, PhD, Department of Reading, Texas Woman's University, Denton, TX

Eurydice Bouchereau Bauer, PhD, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL

Fenice B. Boyd, PhD, Department of Learning and Instruction, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY

Cynthia H. Brock, PhD, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV

Zoe Ann Brown, PhD, Pacific Resources for Education and Learning, Honolulu, HI

Debbie Diller, MEd, educational consultant, Houston, TX

Charles W. Fisher, PhD, School of Education, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Leila Flores-Dueqas, PhD, Department of Language, Literature, and Social Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM

Claudia Christensen Haag, PhD, Lewisville Independent School District, Lewisville, TX

Elfrieda H. Hiebert, PhD, School of Education, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Laura Klenk, PhD, Department of Learning and Instruction, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY

Guofang Li, PhD, Department of Learning and Instruction, State University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY

Laurie MacGillivray, EdD, Division of Learning and Instruction, Rossier School of Education, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Ana Maritza Martinez, MS, Magnolia Elementary School, Los Angeles, CA

Gwendolyn Thompson McMillon, PhD, Department of Reading and Language Arts, Oakland University, Rochester, MI

Vincent Duane McMillon, MSW, Senior Pastor, St. Paul Baptist Church, Saginaw, MI

Mary McVee, PhD, Department of Learning and Instruction, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY

Dorothy K. Moore, PhD, Department of Teacher Education, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI

Elavie Ndura, EdD, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV

Laura A. Parks, MEd, Douglas County School District, Gardnerville, NV

Julie L. Pennington, PhD, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV

Elizabeth Rosado-McGrath, MEd, Spring Branch Independent School District, Houston, TX

Mary S. Rozendal, PhD, Department of Learning and Instruction, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY

Robert Rueda, PhD, Division of Learning and Instruction, Rossier School of Education, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Cheryl Taitague, MA, Pacific Resources for Education and Learning, Honolulu, HI

Judy Wallis, PhD, Spring Branch Independent School District, Houston, TX

Joan Williams, PhD, Department of Teacher Education, Texas Lutheran University, Seguin, TX

Audience

Teachers, reading specialists, administrators, and teacher educators; education students and researchers.

Course Use

Serves as a core text in multicultural literacy methods courses.