Play in Clinical Practice

Evidence-Based Approaches

Edited by Sandra W. Russ and Larissa N. Niec

Hardcovere-bookprint + e-book
Hardcover
January 25, 2011
ISBN 9781609180461
Price: $51.00
352 Pages
Size: 6" x 9"
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e-book
July 7, 2011
ePub ?
Price: $51.00
352 Pages
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print + e-book
Hardcover + e-Book (ePub) ?
Price: $102.00 $56.10
352 Pages
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Going beyond traditional play therapy, this innovative book presents a range of evidence-based assessment and intervention approaches that incorporate play as a key element. It is grounded in the latest knowledge about the importance of play in child development. Leading experts describe effective strategies for addressing a wide variety of clinical concerns, including behavioral difficulties, anxiety, parent–child relationship issues, trauma, and autism. The empirical support for each approach is summarized and clinical techniques are illustrated. The book also discusses school-based prevention programs that utilize play to support children's learning and social-emotional functioning.

“This book will bring the reader up to date on the most current trends in play and playfulness, with a strong, particular emphasis on evidence-based research regarding this topic....We recommend this book to researchers interested in the newest developments in the field of play, and those who may be looking at generating research design for their projects. This is an ideal gift for anyone who expresses doubts about the scientific validity of play interventions.”

Journal of the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry


“This is a valuable book for professionals who work with children. Play is generally thought of as a normal and beneficial component of a child's development, but in this book we see how it can become an effective tool in the healing process. The contributors present current research and different approaches to assessment and treatment. The focus on evidence makes this a unique and refreshing addition to the numerous books about play.”

—Dorothy G. Singer, EdD, Department of Psychology, Yale University


“Play research and play therapy have much to learn from one another. This book opens up an important conversation between the two fields, reviewing a variety of clinical approaches and techniques that incorporate a play component. Fostering collaboration among researchers and clinicians is sure to help all of us better serve children and their families. The book will make a good supplemental text for courses in child development or play therapy.”

—Linda E. Homeyer, PhD, RPT-S, Professional Counseling Program, Texas State University-San Marcos


“Bravo! This book offers a balanced discussion of the value of play. Weaving together chapters on play and learning, assessment, and play-based intervention, it is a timely 'go-to' resource for researchers and clinicians alike.”

—Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, PhD, Lefkowitz Professor of Psychology, Temple University

Table of Contents

I. Play in Child Development

1. Cognitive and Affective Processes in Play, Sandra W. Russ, Julie Fiorelli, and Sara Cain Spannagel

2. Play and Interpersonal Processes Jason F. Jent, Larissa N. Niec, and Sarah E. Baker

II. Play in Evidence-Based Assessment

3. Assessment and Pretend Play, Astrida Seja Kaugars

4. Measuring Parent-Child Interactions through Play, Elizabeth Brestan Knight and Christie A. Salamone

5. Play, Playfulness, and Creativity in Therapeutic Assessment with Children, Deborah J. Tharinger, Gina B. Christopher, and May Matson

III. Play in Evidence-Based Intervention

6. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: The Role of Play in the Behavioral Treatment of Childhood Conduct Problems, Larissa N. Niec, Cheryl Gering, and Emily Abbenante

7. The Use of Play in Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Kristin M. Briggs, Melissa K. Runyon, and Esther Deblinger

8. Play Interventions for Children with Autism, Connie Kasari, Linh Huynh, and Amanda C. Gulrud

9. Integrating Play into Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Child Anxiety Disorders, Donna B. Pincus, Rhea M. Chase, Candice Chow, Courtney L. Weiner, and Jessica Pian

10. Cognitive-Behavioral Play Therapy, Sue M. Knell and Meena Dasari

11. The Importance of Play in Both the Assessment and Treatment of Young Children, Elizabeth J. Short, Maia Noeder, Suzanne Gorovoy, Michael J. Manos, and Barbara Lewis

IV. Play in Evidence-Based Prevention Programs in School Settings

12. Play and Head Start, Sandra J. Bishop-Josef and Edward F. Zigler

13. Play Intervention and Prevention Programs in School Settings, Sandra W. Russ and Beth L. Pearson

14. Conclusions and Implications for the Use of Play in Intervention and Prevention Programs, Sandra W. Russ and Larissa N. Niec


About the Editors

Sandra W. Russ, PhD, a child clinical psychologist, is Professor of Psychology at Case Western Reserve University. Her research and publications focus on pretend play, creativity, and adaptive functioning in children. Dr. Russ has served as President of the Society for Personality Assessment; the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology (APA Division 53); and the Society for the Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts (APA Division 10). She is the developer of the Affect in Play Scale.

Larissa N. Niec, PhD, is Professor of Psychology in the Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program at Central Michigan University (CMU) and Director of the CMU Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Clinic. Dr. Niec conducts basic and applied research on play, child maltreatment, and parent-child interaction therapy. The overarching goal of her research program is to reduce barriers to evidence-based treatment for children and families. She is involved in national efforts to increase the effectiveness of treatment dissemination to community therapists.

Contributors

Emily Abbenante, MA, Department of Psychology, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan

Sarah E. Baker, PhD, Pediatric Prevention Research Center, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan

Sandra Bishop-Josef, PhD, The Edward Zigler Center in Child Development and Social Policy, Child Study Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut

Elizabeth Brestan-Knight, PhD, Department of Psychology, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama

Kristin M. Briggs, EdD, NJ Cares Institute, School of Osteopathic Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Stratford, New Jersey

Rhea M. Chase, PhD, Center for Child and Family Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Candice Chow, MA, Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts

Gina B. Christopher, MA, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas

Meena Dasari, PhD, Metropolitan Center for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, New York, New York

Esther Deblinger, PhD, NJ Cares Institute, School of Osteopathic Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Stratford, New Jersey

Julie Fiorelli, BA, Department of Psychology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio

Cheryl Gering, MA, Department of Psychology, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan

Suzanne Gorovoy, MA, Department of Psychology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio

Amanda C. Gulsrud, PhD, UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Los Angeles, California

Linh Huynh, MA, UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Los Angeles, California

Jason F. Jent, PhD, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida

Connie Kasari, PhD, UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Los Angeles, California

Astrida Seja Kaugars, PhD, Department of Psychology, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Sue M. Knell, PhD, Spectrum Psychological Associates, Mayfield Village, Ohio

Barbara Lewis, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio

Michael J. Manos, PhD, Center for Pediatric Behavioral Health, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio

May Matson, MA, Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas

Larissa N. Niec, PhD, Department of Psychology, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan

Maia Noeder, MA, Department of Psychology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio

Beth L. Pearson, PhD, Children’s Health Council, Palo Alto, California

Jessica Pian, BS, Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts

Donna B. Pincus, PhD, Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts

Melissa K. Runyon, PhD, NJ Cares Institute, School of Osteopathic Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Stratford, New Jersey

Sandra W. Russ, PhD, Department of Psychology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio

Christie A. Salamone, PhD, Columbus Psychological Associates, Columbus, Georgia

Elizabeth J. Short, PhD, Department of Psychology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio

Sara Cain Spannagel, MA, Department of Psychology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio

Deborah J. Tharinger, PhD, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Texas, Austin, Austin, Texas

Courtney L. Weiner, MA, Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts

Edward F. Zigler, PhD, The Edward Zigler Center in Child Development and Social Policy, Child Study Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut

Audience

Child psychologists, play and art therapists, social workers, counselors, family therapists, psychiatrists, and school psychologists; early childhood professionals; developmental psychologists.

Course Use

May serve as a supplemental text in graduate-level courses.