Science and Practice in Cognitive Therapy

Foundations, Mechanisms, and Applications

Edited by Robert L. Leahy

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January 31, 2018
ISBN 9781462533381
Price: $45.00 $38.25
418 Pages
Size: 6" x 9"
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January 31, 2018
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418 Pages
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From leading experts in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)—including CBT originator Aaron T. Beck and many who have worked closely with him—this book provides an overview of where the field is today and presents cutting-edge research and clinical applications. Contributors explain how Beck's cognitive model has been refined and tested over the last 45 years and describe innovative CBT approaches that integrate mindfulness, imagery, emotion-focused interventions, and other strategies. Chapters on specific clinical problems cover the conceptualization and treatment of depression, anxiety disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder, obsessive–compulsive disorder, insomnia, suicidality, substance abuse, couple and family problems, bipolar disorder, psychosis, and personality disorders.

“With an all-star cast of authors, Leahy has produced one of the best volumes in recent years on key CBT concepts and treatment methods. This book is rich with clinical wisdom and new insights. Beginning with the opening chapter by Aaron T. Beck, readers are treated to masterful accounts of CBT's depth, reach, and continuing evolution.”

—Jesse H. Wright, MD, PhD, Professor and Kolb Endowed Chair of Outpatient Psychiatry and Director, Depression Center, University of Louisville


“Leahy has done it again. This fascinating book reviews the foundations of classical cognitive therapy and brings them up to date with the latest advances in science and practice. Contributors elucidate the cognitive factors that make people vulnerable to psychological disorders, describe how CBT strategies are used in treatment, and show how changing cognitive styles and processes is essential for improvement to occur. This book would be most useful for a course on the theoretical foundations of cognitive therapy.”

—Lata K. McGinn, PhD, Director, CBT Training Program for Anxiety and Depression, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University, Albert Einstein College of Medicine


“This volume offers a comprehensive understanding of where CBT has been, where it is now, and where it is going. Refreshing, brisk, and authoritative, the book presents novel, compelling theoretical advances, and details their clinical and research applications. It is a 'must have' for any clinician or researcher who works within the CBT framework or is thinking about doing so. A riveting read.”

—Christine Purdon, PhD, CPsych, Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
Table of Contents

I. Foundations of the Cognitive Model

1. Recovery-Oriented Cognitive Therapy for Schizophrenia: A Personal Perspective, Aaron T. Beck

2. Three Myths and Truths about Beck’s Early Years, Rachael I. Rosner

3. The Fundamental Cognitive Model, Keith S. Dobson, Julia C. Poole, & Judith S. Beck

4. Outcome Studies in Cognitive Therapy, Steven D. Hollon & Robert J. DeRubeis

II. Etiology and Mechanisms of Change

5. Schema Therapy, Arnoud Arntz

6. Emotional Schema Therapy: A Social-Cognitive Model, Robert L. Leahy

7. Cognitive Vulnerability to Depression and Bipolar Disorder, Lauren B. Alloy, Taylor A. Burke, Jared O’Garro-Moore, & Lyn Y. Abramson

8. Cognitive Mediation of Symptom Change in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: A Review of the Evidence, Stefan G. Hofmann, Joseph K. Carpenter, & Joshua Curtiss

9. Mental Imagery in Cognitive Therapy: Research and Examples of Imagery-Focused Emotion, Cognition, and Behavior Change, Fritz Renner & Emily A. Holmes

10. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy: Treatment Development from a Common Cognitive Therapy Core, Zindel V. Segal & Amanda M. Ferguson

III. Understanding and Treating Psychological Disorders

11. Cognitive Therapy for Insomnia, Nicole B. Gumport & Allison G. Harvey

12. Cognitive-Behavioral Couple Therapy, Norman B. Epstein

13. Cognitive-Behavioral Family Therapy, Frank M. Dattilio & Michelle Hanna Collins

14. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for the Reduction of Suicide Risk, Cory F. Newman

15. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Bipolar Disorder, Sheri L. Johnson & Andrew D. Peckham

16. Cognitive Therapy for Psychosis, Anthony P. Morrison & Elizabeth Murphy

17. Advances in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Substance Use Disorders and Addictive Behaviors, Bruce S. Liese & Jessica C. Tripp

18. Cognitive Therapy for Anxiety, David A. Clark

19. Specialized Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder, Debbie Sookman

20. Cognitive Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Patricia A. Resick

21. Cognitive Therapy for Personality Disorders, Denise D. Davis

22. Concluding Thoughts, Robert L. Leahy


About the Editor

Robert L. Leahy, PhD, is Director of the American Institute for Cognitive Therapy in New York and Clinical Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College. His research focuses on individual differences in emotion regulation. Dr. Leahy is Associate Editor of the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy and is past president of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, the International Association for Cognitive Psychotherapy, and the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. He is a recipient of the Aaron T. Beck Award from the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. Dr. Leahy has published numerous books, including Cognitive Therapy Techniques, Second Edition; Treatment Plans and Interventions for Depression and Anxiety Disorders, Second Edition; and Emotion Regulation in Psychotherapy. He is Editor of Guilford's Treatment Plans and Interventions for Evidence-Based Psychotherapy series.
Contributors

Lyn Y. Abramson, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin– Madison, Madison, Wisconsin

Lauren B. Alloy, PhD, Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Arnoud Arntz, PhD, Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Aaron T. Beck, MD, Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania; Department of Psychiatry (Emeritus), University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Judith S. Beck, PhD, Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania

Taylor A. Burke, MA, Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Joseph K. Carpenter, MA, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts

David A. Clark, PhD, Department of Psychology (Emeritus), University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada

Michelle Hanna Collins, MEd, Student Affairs Office, Moravian College, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

Joshua Curtiss, MA, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts

Frank M. Dattilio, PhD, ABPP, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania

Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

Denise D. Davis, PhD, Department of Psychological Studies, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee

Robert J. DeRubeis, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Keith S. Dobson, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Norman B. Epstein, PhD, Department of Family Science, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, Maryland

Amanda M. Ferguson, MA, Graduate Department of Psychological Clinical Science, University of Toronto Scarborough, Ontario, Canada

Nicole B. Gumport, BA, Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California

Allison G. Harvey, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California

Stefan G. Hofmann, PhD, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts

Steven D. Hollon, PhD, Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee

Emily A. Holmes, PhD, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden

Sheri L. Johnson, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California

Robert L. Leahy, PhD, American Institute for Cognitive Therapy, New York, New York

Bruce S. Liese, PhD, Department of Family Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, and Department of Psychology, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas

Anthony P. Morrison, PhD, Division of Psychology and Mental Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom

Elizabeth K. Murphy, Division of Psychology and Mental Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom

Cory F. Newman, PhD, Center for Cognitive Therapy and Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Jared O’Garro-Moore, MA, Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Andrew D. Peckham, PhD, Behavioral Health Partial Hospital Program, McLean Hospital, Belmont, Massachusetts

Julia C. Poole, MSc, Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Fritz Renner, PhD, Medical Research Council, Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom

Patricia A. Resick, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

Rachael I. Rosner, PhD, Independent Scholar, Boston, Massachusetts

Zindel V. Segal, PhD, Graduate Department of Psychological Clinical Science, University of Toronto Scarborough, Scarborough, Ontario, Canada

Debbie Sookman, PhD, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Clinic, Department of Psychology, McGill University Health Center, and Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Jessica C. Tripp, MS, Department of Psychology, The University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee
Audience

Clinical psychologists, psychiatrists, clinical social workers, counselors, and psychiatric nurses.
Will serve as a supplemental text in graduate-level courses.