Handbook of Implicit Social Cognition

Measurement, Theory, and Applications

Edited by Bertram Gawronski and B. Keith Payne

Hardcovere-bookprint + e-book
Hardcover
May 19, 2010
ISBN 9781606236734
Price: $100.00 $85.00
594 Pages
Size: 7" x 10"
order
e-book
July 6, 2011
PDF ?
Price: $100.00 $85.00
594 Pages
order
print + e-book
Hardcover + e-Book (PDF) ?
Price: $200.00 $110.00
594 Pages
order

Virtually every question in social psychology is currently being shaped by the concepts and methods of implicit social cognition. This tightly edited volume provides the first comprehensive overview of the field. Foremost authorities synthesize the latest findings on how automatic, implicit, and unconscious cognitive processes influence social judgments and behavior. Cutting-edge theories and data are presented in such crucial areas as attitudes, prejudice and stereotyping, self-esteem, self-concepts, close relationships, and morality. Describing state-of-the-art measurement procedures and research designs, the book discusses promising applications in clinical, forensic, and other real-world contexts. Each chapter both sums up what is known and identifies key directions for future research.

“Successfully provides a selective yet comprehensive overview of seminal findings, theoretical developments, emerging themes, current and new directions, applications, and unresolved issues of social cognition research. The authors not only provide lucid, scholarly, detailed discussions, but also reveal and revel in enhanced communication among subdisciplines within and outside psychology....The Handbook of Implicit Social Cognition deserves a careful reading and rereading and a special place on the bookshelf of anyone serious about empirically exploring this topic. It would be a useful resource in an advanced undergraduate or graduate social cognition research course.”

PsycCRITIQUES


“A primary strength of this volume is the way in which seemingly different areas of research have been organized into five distinct sections, each of which builds upon the previous sections to provide a comprehensive understanding of implicit social cognition: (1) the basic information needed to understand implicit social cognition research, (2) detailed descriptions of relevant methods and procedures, (3) cross-cutting perspectives, (4) domain-specific perspectives, and (5) practical applications....That such a comprehensive and cross-cutting review can be generated from such contemporary research is an indicator of the breadth and depth of implicit social cognition research. It is a valuable strength of this book that many chapters provide a strong focus on empirical methods as well as exciting avenues for future research. Even the novice researcher may benefit from the practical guides to implicit theory and measurement. This book would be especially interesting and useful for active researchers across a variety of domains who are interested in understanding how implicit processes can influence human behavior.”

Canadian Psychology


“Research into implicit social cognition keeps growing at a rapid rate. This authoritative handbook takes stock of where we are and offers perspectives on where we might go. In 29 chapters, a stellar group of contributors identify the conceptual foundations of implicit social cognition, provide practical advice on the use of implicit measures, and review what has been learned from them in a broad range of areas, from attitude and personality research to health psychology, politics, and consumer behavior. This handbook will be an invaluable resource for years to come and required reading in many graduate courses.”

—Norbert Schwarz, PhD, Charles Horton Cooley Collegiate Professor of Psychology, University of Michigan


“For many years, psychologists and laypersons have been fascinated by the idea that people are unaware of many mental processes that drive their social behavior. This volume presents a comprehensive review of cutting-edge research on what these mental processes are, whether they can be accurately measured, and how they affect human relations. Cumulatively, the chapters in this book shed new light on the old question of whether people know more about themselves than they can or want to tell.”

—Yaacov Trope, PhD, Department of Psychology, New York University

Table of Contents

1. A History of Implicit Social Cognition: Where Is It Coming From? Where Is It Now? Where Is It Going?, B. Keith Payne and Bertram Gawronski

I. Basics

2. In Search of a Measure That Qualifies as Implicit: Recommendations Based on a Decompositional View of Automaticity, Agnes Moors, Adriaan Spruyt, and Jan De Houwer

3. Models of Implicit and Explicit Mental Representation, Don Carlston

4. Building Blocks of Social Behavior: Reflective and Impulsive Processes, Roland Deutsch and Fritz Strack

5. Implicit Social Cognition: Insights from Social Neuroscience, Tiffany A. Ito

II. Methods and Procedures

6. A Practical Guide to Sequential Priming and Related Tasks, Dirk Wentura and Juliane Degner

7. A Practical Guide to Implicit Association Tests and Related Tasks, Sara Teige-Mocigemba, Karl Christoph Klauer, and Jeffrey W. Sherman

8. A Practical Guide to Paper-and-Pencil Implicit Measures of Attitudes, Denise Sekaquaptewa, Patrick Vargas, and William von Hippel

9. Mathematical Modeling of Implicit Social Cognition: The Machine in the Ghost, Jeffrey W. Sherman, Karl Christoph Klauer, and Thomas J. Allen

10. Implicit Measures: Similarities and Differences, Jan De Houwer and Agnes Moors

III. Cross-Cutting Perspectives

11. Consciousness, Introspection, and the Adaptive Unconscious, Wilhelm Hofmann and Timothy D. Wilson

12. Formation, Change, and Contextualization of Mental Associations: Determinants and Principles of Variations in Implicit Measures, Bertram Gawronski and Rajees Sritharan

13. The Development of Implicit Social Cognition, Kristina R. Olson and Yarrow Dunham

14. Prediction of Behavior, Marco Perugini, Juliette Richetin, and Cristina Zogmaister

15. Automatic Aspects of Judgment and Decision Making, Galen V. Bodenhausen and Andrew R. Todd

16. Consistency and Inconsistency in Implicit Social Cognition: The Case of Implicit and Explicit Measures of Attitudes, Robert J. Rydell and Allen R. McConnell

17. What is Implicit about Goal Pursuit?, Melissa J. Ferguson and Shanette C. Porter

IV. Domain-Specific Perspectives

18. Attitude Structure and Change: Implications for Implicit Measures, Richard E. Petty and Pablo Briñol

19. Implicit Intergroup Bias: Cognitive, Affective, and Motivational Underpinnings, David M. Amodio and Saaid A. Mendoza

20. Racial Bias and Stereotyping: Interpersonal Processes, Sophie Trawalter and Jenessa R. Shapiro

21. Two Faces of Self-Esteem: Implicit and Explicit Forms of Self-Esteem, Virgil Zeigler-Hill and Christian H. Jordan

22. The Self-Concept: New Insights from Implicit Measurement Procedures, Konrad Schnabel and Jens B. Asendorpf

23. Measuring Implicit Processes in Close Relationships, Mark W. Baldwin, John E. Lydon, M. Joy McClure, and Sara Etchison

24. Divided Minds, Divided Morals: How Implicit Social Cognition Underpins and Undermines our Sense of Social Justice, B. Keith Payne and C. Daryl Cameron

V. Applied Perspectives

25. Implicit Cognition in Health Psychology: Why Common Sense Goes Out the Window, Reinout W. Wiers, Katrijn Houben, Anne Roefs, Peter de Jong, Wilhelm Hofmann, and Alan W. Stacy

26. Clinical Applications of Implicit Social Cognition Theories and Methods, Bethany A. Teachman, Meghan W. Cody, and Elise M. Clerkin

27. Implicit Social Cognition in Forensic Settings, Robert J. Snowden and Nicola S. Gray

28. Implicit Social Cognition and Indirect Measures in Consumer Behavior, Andrew Perkins and Mark Forehand

29. Implicit Political Cognition, Brian A. Nosek, Jesse Graham, and Carlee Beth Hawkins


About the Editors

Bertram Gawronski, PhD, is Professor of Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. His research investigates the mental underpinnings and behavioral consequences of spontaneous and deliberate evaluations of objects, individuals, groups, and social issues. Dr. Gawronski's work has been recognized with honors including the Theoretical Innovation Prize from SPSP, the Career Trajectory Award from SESP, the Early Career Award from the International Social Cognition Network, the Early Researcher Award from the Ministry of Research and Innovation of Ontario, and the Charlotte-and-Karl-Bühler Award from the German Psychological Society. He is a fellow of APS, SESP, and SPSP.

B. Keith Payne, PhD, is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research is concerned with the development of innovative approaches for studying automatic and controlled processes underpinning social behavior. Dr. Payne is a recipient of the Early Career Award from the International Social Cognition Network and the SAGE Young Scholars Award from the Foundation for Social and Personality Psychology and Sage Publications. He was profiled as a “Rising Star” in psychology in the Association for Psychological Science Observerand was cited by the Observer as one of the Top Ten most highly cited Social/Personality Psychologists at the Assistant Professor rank in the United States.

Contributors

Thomas J. Allen, MA, Department of Psychology, University of California, Davis, Davis, California

David M. Amodio, PhD, Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, New York

Jens B. Asendorpf, PhD, Institute for Psychology, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

Mark W. Baldwin, PhD, Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Galen V. Bodenhausen, PhD, Department of Psychology, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois

Pablo Briñol, PhD, Department of Social Psychology, Autonomous University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain

C. Daryl Cameron, MA, Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Don Carlston, PhD, Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana

Elise M. Clerkin, MA, Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia

Meghan W. Cody, MA, Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia

Jan De Houwer, PhD, Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium

Peter de Jong, PhD, Department of Clinical and Developmental Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands

Juliane Degner, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Roland Deutsch, PhD, Department of Psychology, Universität Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany

Yarrow Dunham, EdD, Department of Psychological Sciences, University of California, Merced, Merced, California

Sara Etchison, BA, Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Melissa J. Ferguson, PhD, Department of Psychology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

Mark Forehand, PhD, Michael G. Foster School of Business, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

Bertram Gawronski, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas

Jesse Graham, MA, Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia

Nicola S. Gray, PhD, School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom

Carlee Beth Hawkins, BS, Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia

Wilhelm Hofmann, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany

Katrijn Houben, PhD, Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Faculty of Psychology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands

Tiffany A. Ito, PhD, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado

Christian H. Jordan, PhD, Department of Psychology, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

Karl Christoph Klauer, PhD, Institute of Psychology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany

John E. Lydon, PhD, Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

M. Joy McClure, BA, Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Allen R. McConnell, PhD, Department of Psychology, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio

Saaid A. Mendoza, PhD, Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, New York

Agnes Moors, PhD, Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium

Brian A. Nosek, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia

Kristina R. Olson, PhD, Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

B. Keith Payne, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Andrew Perkins, PhD, Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Business, Rice University, Houston, Texas

Marco Perugini, PhD, Faculty of Psychology, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan, Italy

Richard E. Petty, PhD, Department of Psychology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio

Shanette C. Porter, MA, Department of Psychology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

Juliette Richetin, PhD, Faculty of Psychology, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan, Italy

Anne Roefs, PhD, Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands

Robert J. Rydell, PhD, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana

Konrad Schnabel, PhD, Institute for Psychology, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

Denise Sekaquaptewa, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Jenessa R. Shapiro, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

Jeffrey W. Sherman, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of California, Davis, Davis, California

Robert J. Snowden, PhD, School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom

Adriaan Spruyt, PhD, Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium

Rajees Sritharan, BA, Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

Alan W. Stacy, PhD, School of Community and Global Health, Claremont Graduate University, San Dimas, California

Fritz Strack, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany

Bethany A. Teachman, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia

Sarah Teige-Mocigemba, PhD, Institute for Psychology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany

Andrew R. Todd, PhD, Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät, Institute of Psychology, University of Köln, Köln, Germany

Sophie Trawalter, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Patrick Vargas, PhD, Department of Advertising, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois

William von Hippel, PhD, School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia

Dirk Wentura, PhD, Department of Psychology, Saarland University, Saarbruecken, Germany

Reinout W. Wiers, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Timothy D. Wilson, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia

Virgil Zeigler-Hill, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Mississippi

Cristina Zogmaister, PhD, Faculty of Psychology, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan, Italy

Audience

Researchers and graduate students in social and cognitive psychology; also of interest to readers in applied contexts, including health, clinical, forensic, consumer, and political psychology.

Course Use

May serve as a supplemental text in graduate-level courses in social cognition and psychology research methods.