The Treatment of Eating Disorders

A Clinical Handbook

Edited by Carlos M. Grilo and James E. Mitchell

Paperbacke-bookprint + e-book
Paperback
March 18, 2011
ISBN 9781609184957
Price: $56.00 $47.60
606 Pages
Size: 7" x 10"
Copyright Date: 2010
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e-book
March 1, 2011
ePub and PDF ?
Price: $56.00 $47.60
606 Pages
Copyright Date: 2010
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print + e-book
Paperback + e-Book (ePub and PDF) ?
Price: $112.00 $61.60
606 Pages
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"Clinicians and students interested in the assessment and treatment of patients with eating disorders will definitely want to own this book. It's a keeper...."   read more »
Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

Eminently practical and authoritative, this comprehensive clinical handbook brings together leading international experts on eating disorders to describe the most effective treatments and how to implement them. Coverage encompasses psychosocial, family-based, medical, and nutritional therapies for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorder, and other eating disorders and disturbances. Especially noteworthy are "mini-manuals" that present the nuts and bolts of 11 of the treatment approaches, complete with reproducible handouts and forms. The volume also provides an overview of assessment, treatment planning, and medical management issues. Special topics include psychiatric comorbidities, involuntary treatment, support for caregivers, childhood eating disorders, and new directions in treatment research and evaluation.

“A superb resource, presenting the best perspectives of an internationally renowned group of the field's leading authorities. The handbook accomplishes several feats. First, its clearly written chapters review the tried and true; next, it updates the growing evidence base on which clinical practices have increasingly relied; and finally, it describes some of the newer and still-evolving theoretical paradigms and treatment strategies for eating disorders, several of which have not previously appeared in major texts. This collection represents as clear a status report as I've seen regarding how the field is thinking about what current and emerging treatments can offer....Clinicians and students interested in the assessment and treatment of patients with eating disorders will definitely want to own this book. It's a keeper.”

Journal of Clinical Psychiatry


“The authors in this text are leading experts on the topic and they have contributed specific treatments and state-of-the-art treatment approaches. The 35 chapters comprehensively cover what is known about diagnoses, treating serious eating disorders, and what needs to be learned to improve diagnosis and treatment. One distinctive feature of this primarily clinical handbook is the inclusion of 'mini-manuals' describing specific treatment approaches....There are also illustrative clinical examples modeling the use of specific techniques....This well-written clinical handbook is a valuable addition to the literature on eating disorders. It covers all the basics, beginning with diagnoses, following with treatment, and lastly, addressing research needs. This book serves both as a teaching function and a reference work. It is a valuable and worthwhile contribution to the field.”

Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic


“A comprehensive guide that covers the treatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder in significant depth. For each of these conditions, there is a chapter on pharmacotherapy as well as many chapters on the different types of psychotherapy for that disorder. The volume, which is authored by multiple authors, including many prominent names in the eating disorders field, is divided into five parts and contains 35 chapters....This is a great book and one that I wish had been available when I was in training. It is more comprehensive than other books on the topic that either address some but not all of these issues, or are more superficial. As a clinician rather than a researcher, I like the way in which the research is summarized so that it does not interrupt the flow for clinician readers. At the same time, each chapter includes extensive references for those who want to pursue the research in more detail. The text is comprehensive yet readable. It is well organized and is the broadest review of eating disorders that I have seen....Psychiatrists, psychologists, and other graduate-level mental health professionals would find this a valuable book.”

Journal of Psychiatric Practice


“Has a breadth of information, making it a valuable resource. It enhances the reader's knowledge and expertise by bringing together leading experts across the globe....This book is well-written. Clinical psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, counselors, nurses, dieticians, and other health professionals will find it a useful resource. It offers a thought-provoking and thorough overview of the state of our knowledge in the treatment of eating disorders....Readers will find that this book discusses many issues that are crucial to their clinical practice and research.”

Psychology of Women Quarterly


“Substantial and substantive…Drs. Grilo and Mitchell have recruited an internationally renowned group of authorities….The 35 chapters cover all aspects of treatment….Chapters describing the usual approaches of CBT, IPT, psychodynamic psychotherapy, medication management, and the like provide scholarly reviews, updates, treatment principles, and a few ‘mini-manuals.’”

Eating Disorders Review


“This is a big book with a big task. Well-chosen authors contribute 35 chapters and over550 pages of well-referenced text. In the world of systematic reviews and electronic literature searching, there is still an important role for a high-quality reference that offers not only data, but also perspective. This volume fills that role. It deserves to do well.”

—Bob Palmer, FRCPsych, Professor of Psychiatry, Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, United Kingdom


“A landmark contribution from internationally renowned clinical researchers. This practical volume informs the reader about state-of-the-art empirically based and promising treatments, and it provides a uniquely effective guide on how to deliver these treatments. A 'must-have' for clinicians, researchers, and students in the field.”

—David B. Herzog, MD, Endowed Professor of Psychiatry in the Field of Eating Disorders, Harvard Medical School


“Edited by two leaders in the field, with chapters from a 'who's who' of cutting-edge researchers and clinicians, this book is an outstanding resource. It is a top-rate presentation of all the needed information.”

—Kelly D. Brownell, PhD, Robert L. Flowers Professor of Public Policy and Dean, Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University

Table of Contents

I. Overview of Eating Disorders

1. Diagnosis, Assessment, and Treatment Planning for Anorexia Nervosa, Pamela K. Keel and Laurie McCormick

2. Diagnosis, Assessment, and Treatment Planning for Bulimia Nervosa, Scott J. Crow and Beth Brandenburg

3. Diagnosis, Assessment, and Treatment Planning for Binge-Eating Disorder and Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified, Jennifer E. Wildes and Marsha D. Marcus

4. Medical Complications of Eating Disorders, Philip S. Mehler, C. Laird Birmingham, Scott J. Crow, and Joel P. Jahraus

II. Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa

5. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa, Kathleen M. Pike, Jacqueline C. Carter, and Marion P. Olmsted

6. Specialist Supportive Clinical Management for Anorexia Nervosa, Virginia V. W. McIntosh, Jennifer Jordan, and Cynthia M. Bulik

7. Cognitive Remediation Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa, Kate Tchanturia and David Hambrook

8. Family-Based Treatments for Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa: Single-Family and Multifamily Approaches, Ivan Eisler, James Lock, and Daniel le Grange

9. Pharmacotherapy for Anorexia Nervosa, Allan S. Kaplan and Andrew Howlett

10. Nutritional Rehabilitation for Anorexia Nervosa, Cheryl L. Rock

11. Inpatient and Day Hospital Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa, Marion P. Olmsted, Traci L. McFarlane, Jacqueline C. Carter, Kathryn Trottier, D. Blake Woodside, and Gina Dimitropoulos

12. Compulsory (Involuntary) Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa, Stephen W. Touyz and Terry Carney

13. The Chronically Ill Patient with Anorexia Nervosa: Development, Phenomenology, and Therapeutic Considerations, Michael Strober

III. Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa and Binge-Eating Disorder

14. Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa, Zafra Cooper and Christopher G. Fairburn

15. Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Bulimia Nervosa and Binge-Eating Disorder, Marian Tanofsky-Kraff and Denise E. Wilfley

16. Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa and Binge-Eating Disorder, Eunice Y. Chen and Debra L. Safer

17. Integrative Cognitive–Affective Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa, Stephen A. Wonderlich, Carol B. Peterson, Tracey L. Smith, Marj Klein, James E. Mitchell, Scott J. Crow, and Scott G. Engel

18. Psychodynamic Therapy for Eating Disorders, Kathryn J. Zerbe

19. Self-Help Approaches for Bulimia Nervosa and Binge-Eating Disorder, Varinia C. Sánchez-Ortiz and Ulrike Schmidt

20. Family-Based Treatment for Adolescents with Bulimia Nervosa, Daniel le Grange and James Lock

21. Pharmacotherapy for Bulimia Nervosa, Allegra Broft, Laura A. Berner, and B. Timothy Walsh

22. Pharmacotherapy for Binge-Eating Disorder, Lindsay P. Bodell and Michael J. Devlin

IV. Special Topics in Treatment

23. Treatment of Childhood Eating Difficulties and Disorders, Rachel Bryant-Waugh and Bryan Lask

24. Obesity Treatment for Binge-Eating Disorder in the Obese, Martina de Zwaan

25. Eating Problems and Bariatric Surgery, Melissa A. Kalarchian, Marsha D. Marcus, and Anita P. Courcoulas

26. Treatment of Psychiatric Comorbidities, Howard Steiger and Mimi Israel

27. Treatment for Night-Eating Syndrome, Kelly C. Allison and Albert J. Stunkard

28. Treatment for Body-Image Disturbances, Susan J. Paxton and Siân A. McLean

29. Caring for Someone with an Eating Disorder, Elizabeth Goddard, Pam Macdonald, and Janet Treasure

30. New Technologies in Treatments for Eating Disorders, Scott G. Engel and Stephen A. Wonderlich

V. Research Issues

31. Evaluating the Efficacy of Eating Disorder Treatments: Research Design and Statistical Issues, Ross D. Crosby and Scott G. Engel

32. Assessment of Eating Disorder Treatment Efficacy, Carol B. Peterson

33. What Treatment Research is Needed for Anorexia Nervosa?, W. Stewart Agras and Athena Hagler Robinson

34. What Treatment Research Is Needed for Bulimia Nervosa?, G. Terence Wilson

35. What Treatment Research Is Needed for Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified and Binge-Eating Disorder?, Carlos M. Grilo


About the Editors

Carlos M. Grilo, PhD, is Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Program for Obesity, Weight, and Eating Research at Yale University School of Medicine. He is also Professor of Psychology at Yale University. Dr. Grilo’s primary research focus is on eating disorders and obesity; secondary interests include personality disorders and psychopathology. He has received numerous research grants and has served as Principal Investigator on eight grants from the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Grilo serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Behaviour Research and Therapy, Obesity, Obesity Surgery, International Journal of Eating Disorders, Journal of Psychiatric Practice, and International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology. He has written over 260 peer-reviewed journal articles and one book, Eating and Weight Disorders.

James E. Mitchell, MD, is the NRI/Lee A. Christofferson, MD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Clinical Neuroscience at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences. He is also the Chester Fritz Distinguished University Professor and President and Scientific Director of the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute. Dr. Mitchell’s research focuses on eating disorders, obesity, and bariatric surgery. Past president of the Academy for Eating Disorders and the Eating Disorders Research Society, he has received honors including the Award for Research in the Field of Eating Disorders from the Academy for Eating Disorders and the Visionary Award from the Eating Disorders Research Society. He has served as Principal Investigator on 11 grants from the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Mitchell is on the editorial boards of the International Journal of Eating Disorders, Eating Disorders Review, and Obesity Reviews. He has written over 350 scientific articles and is coauthor or editor of 14 books.

Contributors

W. Stewart Agras, MD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California

Kelly C. Allison, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Laura A. Berner, BA, Eating Disorders Research Unit, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York

C. Laird Birmingham, MD, Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Lindsay P. Bodell, BA, Eating Disorders Research Unit, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York

Beth Brandenburg, MD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Allegra Broft, MD, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, New York

Rachel Bryant-Waugh, PhD, Department Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, United Kingdom

Cynthia M. Bulik, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Terry Carney, PhD, Sydney Law School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia

Jacqueline C. Carter, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Eunice Y. Chen, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

Zafra Cooper, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom

Anita P. Courcoulas, MD, Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Ross D. Crosby, PhD, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota

Scott J. Crow, MD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Michael J. Devlin, MD, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, New York

Martina de Zwaan, MD, Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany

Gina Dimitropoulos, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Ivan Eisler PhD, Section of Family Therapy, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom

Scott G. Engel, PhD, Neuropsychiatric Research Institute and Department of Clinical Neuroscience, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, North Dakota

Christopher G. Fairburn, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom

Elizabeth Goddard, MSc, Division of Psychological Medicine and Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom

Carlos M. Grilo, PhD, Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

David Hambrook, PhD, Division of Psychological Medicine and Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom

Andrew Howlett, MD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Mimi Israel, MD, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Joel P. Jahraus, MD, Eating Disorders Institute, Park Nicollet Health Services, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Jennifer Jordan, PhD, Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

Melissa A. Kalarchian, PhD, Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Allan S. Kaplan, MD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Pamela K. Keel, PhD, Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida

Marj Klein, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin

Bryan Lask, MD, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children and Ellern Mede Centre, London, United Kingdom; Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway

Daniel le Grange, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

James Lock, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California

Pam Macdonald, MSc, Division of Psychological Medicine and Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom

Marsha D. Marcus, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, and Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh

Laurie McCormick, MD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Iowa, Ames, Iowa

Traci L. McFarlane, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Virginia V. W. McIntosh, PhD, Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

Sií¢n A. McLean, MA, Department of Psychological Science, La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia

Phillip S. Mehler, MD, ACUTE Eating Disorders Program, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado

James E. Mitchell, MD, Neuropsychiatric Research Institute and Department of Clinical Neuroscience, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, North Dakota

Marion P. Olmsted, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Susan J. Paxton, PhD, Department of Psychological Science, La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia

Carol B. Peterson, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Kathleen M. Pike, PhD, Department of Psychology, Temple University Japan Campus, Tokyo, Japan

Athena Hagler Robinson, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California

Cheryl L. Rock, PhD, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California

Debra L. Safer, MD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California

Varinia C. Sínchez-Ortiz, PhD, Department of Psychological Medicine and Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom

Ulrike Schmidt, MD, Department of Psychological Medicine and Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom

Tracey L. Smith, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin, and William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin

Howard Steiger, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Michael Strober, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

Albert J. Stunkard, MD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Marian Tanofsky-Kraff, PhD, Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland

Kate Tchanturia, PhD, Department of Psychological Medicine and Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom

Stephen W. Touyz, PhD, School of Psychology, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia

Janet Treasure, MD, Eating Disorders Research Unit, Department of Academic Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom

Kathryn Trottier, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

B. Timothy Walsh, MD, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, New York

Jennifer E. Wildes, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Denise E. Wilfley, PhD, Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri

G. Terence Wilson, PhD, Department of Psychology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey

Stephen A. Wonderlich, PhD, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota

D. Blake Woodside, MD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Kathryn J. Zerbe, MD, Department of Psychiatry, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon

Audience

Clinical psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, nurses, dieticians, and other health professionals who treat patients with eating disorders.

Course Use

Will serve as a text in graduate-level courses.