Understanding Peer Influence in Children and Adolescents

Edited by Mitchell J. Prinstein and Kenneth A. Dodge

HardcoverPaperback
Hardcover
May 13, 2008
ISBN 9781593853976
Price: $85.00 $63.75
255 Pages
Size: 6" x 9"
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Paperback
March 3, 2010
ISBN 9781606236475
Price: $35.00 $26.25
255 Pages
Size: 6" x 9"
order

Scientists, educators, and parents of teens have long recognized the potency of peer influences on children and youth, but until recently, questions of how and why adolescents emulate their peers were largely overlooked. This book presents a comprehensive framework for understanding the processes by which peers shape each other's attitudes and behavior, and explores implications for intervention and prevention. Leading authorities share compelling findings on such topics as how drug use, risky sexual behavior, and other deviant behaviors “catch on” among certain peer groups or cliques; the social, cognitive, developmental, and contextual factors that strengthen or weaken the power of peer influence; and the nature of positive peer influences and how to support them.

“Each chapter stands alone and provides unique insights....Useful and informative for anyone interested in working with children and adolescents....Use this book as a resource. Look up a topic in the index, or read one chapter at a time, with sticky notes ready to flag and comment on the themes that resonate with you and your work. It is worth it.”

Prevention Researcher


“Prinstein and Dodge are to be  commended  for bringing together chapters that jointly provide, in one  short and  very readable volume, an accessible overview that delivers  what is  promised: an understanding of how peers influence children and   adolescents.”

Canadian Paychology


“The topic of peer influences has long been important to the field. This remarkable volume from distinguished editors and contributors proposes original and compelling conceptual models that will elucidate peer influence processes for researchers and students alike. In addition, many of the authors discuss general and specific implications of their work for prevention and intervention programs. This book would be an excellent text for advanced undergraduates, master's students, and beginning doctoral students in developmental, educational, school, and clinical psychology.”

—W. Andrew Collins, PhD, Morse-Alumni Distinguished Teaching Professor, Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota


“This volume brings together leading researchers to piece together the puzzle of peer influences, highlighting their mechanisms, moderators, contexts, and the potential for interventions that capitalize on positive peer processes. With this understanding, we can begin to consider the developmental supports that children and youth require individually and collectively to promote social adaptation. The picture of peer processes emerging from this volume is critical to informing the strategies and policies of a broad range of professionals responsible for children and youth.”

—Debra Pepler, PhD, LaMarsh Centre for Research on Violence and Conflict Resolution, York University


“While it has long been known that adolescents influence one another, insufficient attention has been given to how, where, and when these influences occur. This first-rate volume considers the mechanisms and processes involved in peer influence from a variety of conceptual and theoretical viewpoints and presents a fascinating sampling of new research.”

—Willard W. Hartup, EdD, Regents' Professor Emeritus, Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota

Table of Contents

I. Introduction

1. Current Issues in Peer Influence Research, Mitchell J. Prinstein and Kenneth A. Dodge

II. Peer Influence Mechanisms

2. A Comprehensive Conceptualization of the Peer Influence Process in Adolescence, B. Bradford Brown, Jeremy P. Bakken, Suzanne W. Ameringer, and Shelly D. Mahon

3. Cognitive Social Influence: Moderation, Mediation, Modification, and...the Media, Frederick X. Gibbons, Elizabeth A. Pomery, and Meg Gerrard

4. Dynamics and Ecology of Adolescent Peer Influence, Thomas J. Dishion, Timothy F. Piehler, and Michael W. Myers

5. Deviance Regulation Theory: Applications to Adolescent Social Influence, Hart Blanton and Melissa Burkley

III. Altering Peer Influence Effects: Moderators and Interventions

6. Variation in Patterns of Peer Influence: Considerations of Self and Other, William M. Bukowski, Ana Maria Velasquez, and Mara Brendgen

7. Adolescent Peer Influences: Beyond the Dark Side, Joseph P. Allen and Jill Antonishak

8. Mobilizing and Weakening Peer Influence as Mechanisms for Changing Behavior: Implications for Alcohol Intervention Programs, Deborah A. Prentice

9. Identity Signaling, Social Influence, and Social Contagion, Jonah Berger

IV. Underexplored Contexts for Potential Peer Influence Effects

10. Homophily in Adolescent Romantic Relationships, Wyndol Furman and Valerie A. Simon

11. Peer Influence in Involuntary Social Groups: Lessons from Research on Bullying, Jaana Juvonen and Adriana Galván


About the Editors

Mitchell J. Prinstein, PhD, ABPP, is the John Van Seters Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience and Director of Clinical Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research examines interpersonal models of internalizing symptoms and health-risk behaviors among adolescents, with a focus on the unique role of peer relationships in the developmental psychopathology of depression, self-injury, and suicidality. Dr. Prinstein is a past editor of the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology and a past president of the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology and the Society for Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. He is a recipient of awards including the Theodore Blau Early Career Award from the Society of Clinical Psychology of the American Psychological Association (APA), the Brickell Memorial Award for research on suicidality from Columbia University, the Mentor Award from the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, the Beverly Thorn Award for Outstanding Service from the Council of University Directors of Clinical Psychology, and the Raymond D. Fowler Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Professional Development of Graduate Students from the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students.

Kenneth A. Dodge, PhD, is the Pritzker Professor of Public Policy and Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. He is Founding and Emeritus Director of the Duke Center for Child and Family Policy. A clinical and developmental psychologist, Dr. Dodge studies early childhood development, prevention of violent behavior in the family, and public policy to improve population outcomes for communities. He is the developer of Family Connects, a population approach to improve children’s outcomes in the first year of life. The author of more than 500 highly cited scientific articles, which have been cited more than 100,000 times, Dr. Dodge has been elected into the National Academy of Medicine and is the 2019–2021 President of the Society for Research in Child Development.

Contributors

Joseph P. Allen, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia

Suzanne W. Ameringer, PhD, School of Nursing, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia

Jill Antonishak, PhD, U.S. Congress, Washington, DC

Jeremy P. Bakken, MS, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin

Jonah Berger, PhD, Department of Marketing, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Hart Blanton, PhD, Department of Psychology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas

Mara Brendgen, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Quebec, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

B. Bradford Brown, PhD, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin

William M. Bukowski, PhD, Department of Psychology and Centre for Research in Human Development, Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Melissa Burkley, PhD, Department of Psychology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma

Thomas J. Dishion, PhD, Child and Family Center and Departments of Psychology and School Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon

Kenneth A. Dodge, PhD, Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina

Wyndol Furman, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado

Adriana Galván, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, California

Meg Gerrard, PhD, Department of Psychology, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

Frederick X. Gibbons, PhD, Department of Psychology, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

Jaana Juvonen, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, California

Shelly D. Mahon, MS, Department of Human Development and Family Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin

Michael W. Myers, MS, Child and Family Center and Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon

Timothy F. Piehler, MS, Child and Family Center and Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon

Elizabeth A. Pomery, MS, Department of Psychology, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

Deborah A. Prentice, PhD, Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey

Mitchell J. Prinstein, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Valerie A. Simon, PhD, Merrill Palmer-Skillman Institute and Department of Psychology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan

Ana Maria Velasquez, MA, Department of Psychology and Centre for Research in Human Development, Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Audience

Researchers, practitioners, and students in developmental, clinical, and school psychology; social work; education; criminology; public policy; and related disciplines.

Course Use

May serve as a supplemental text in graduate-level courses.