Handbook of Writing Research

Second Edition

Edited by Charles A. MacArthur, Steve Graham, and Jill Fitzgerald

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October 13, 2015
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The definitive reference in the field, this volume synthesizes current knowledge on writing development and instruction at all grade levels. Prominent scholars examine numerous facets of writing from sociocultural, cognitive, linguistic, neuroscience, and new literacy/technological perspectives. The volume reviews the evidence base for widely used instructional approaches, including those targeting particular components of writing. Issues in teaching specific populations—including students with disabilities and English learners—are addressed. Innovative research methods and analytic tools are clearly explained, and key directions for future investigation identified.

New to This Edition See also Best Practices in Writing Instruction, Third Edition, edited by Steve Graham, Charles A. MacArthur, and Michael Hebert, an accessible course text and practitioner's guide.

“This book as a whole is an amazing tour de force. Every chapter is informative, detailed, and instructive....Essential reading for those in the field, for those who want to know about it, and for those who want to join in.”

PsycCRITIQUES (on the first edition)


“This handbook offers welcome breadth in its consideration of writing instruction and assessment from cognitive, neuropsychological, pedagogical, and sociocultural perspectives. Updates in the second edition include useful chapters on the use of computerized tutoring and other cutting-edge issues. There is also new information on research methods, teaching writing to English language learners, and more. The inclusion of such topics as writing to learn, argumentative writing, and the relationship between writing and reading is consistent with the Common Core English Language Arts standards. Many of the contributors are prominent writing researchers. The volume is comprehensive and has good potential as a text in graduate programs in literacy and educational psychology.”

—Dolores Perin, PhD, Teachers College, Columbia University


“Anyone who wants to keep up with the rapidly evolving field of writing research will welcome this extensively revised second edition. An attractive text for graduate courses, the book provides students with a valuable survey of the field. Most chapters are entirely new; the few that are not have been updated to account for recent findings. The authors represent diverse points of view on writing research and offer lucid accounts of their perspectives. Of special note are chapters that provide thoughtful challenges to widely accepted beliefs about writing, such as Mark Torrance’s persuasive critique of accepted wisdom about planning and Richard Hudson’s case for the importance of teaching grammar.”

—John R. Hayes, PhD, Department of Psychology (Emeritus), Carnegie Mellon University


“The theoretical and methodological lenses represented in the second edition range widely, and analytical tools that technology has enabled are discussed. More embracing of international and newer scholars than its predecessor, the volume offers readers the opportunity not only to pursue their main interests, but also to sample—and perhaps delve into—additional areas. Among the notable additions is a chapter on professional development, a key topic given efforts internationally to raise student writing performance. This is a book that invites revisiting.”

—Judy M. Parr, PhD, Head of School of Curriculum and Pedagogy, University of Auckland, New Zealand


“This updated and expanded second edition is as comprehensive as its predecessor. What sets this volume apart from other handbooks is its vast array of perspectives from around the globe, including both veteran researchers and rising scholars. A 'must read' for advanced graduate students and writing researchers alike.”

—Susan De La Paz, PhD, College of Education, University of Maryland, College Park


“This singular volume attests to the maturity and breadth of writing research. MacArthur, Graham, and Fitzgerald have gone to great lengths to achieve this impressive roadmap. The volume presents deep theoretical understandings, multifaceted views on typical and atypical writing development, cutting-edge analytic tools, and evidence-based, insightful instructional approaches. It provides literacy scholars, students, and practitioners with a blueprint and the necessary wisdom to confront the challenges of writing instruction in the 21st century.”

—Rui A. Alves, PhD, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Porto, Portugal

Table of Contents

Introduction, Charles A. MacArthur, Steve Graham, and Jill Fitzgerald

I. Theories and Models of Writing

1. What Do Sociocultural Studies of Writing Tell Us about Learning to Write?, Charles Bazerman

2. Writing Research from a Cognitive Perspective, Charles A. MacArthur and Steve Graham

3. Writing Research from a New Literacies Lens, Donald J. Leu, David Slomp, Lisa Zawilinski, and Julie Corrigan

II. Writing Development

4. Writing Process Theory: A Functional Dynamic Approach, Huub van den Bergh, Gert Rijlaarsdam, and Elke van Steendam

5. Understanding Planning in Text Production, Mark Torrance

6. A Sociocultural Perspective on Writing Development: Toward an Agenda for Classroom Research on Students' Use of Social Practices, Richard Beach, George E. Newell, and Jennifer VanDerHeide

7. After Writing, After School, Katherine Schultz, Glynda A. Hull, and Jennifer Higgs

8. The Development of Multileveled Writing Systems of the Brain: Brain Lessons for Writing Instruction, Karin H. James, R. Joanne Jao, and Virginia Berninger

9. From Language to Text: The Development and Learning of Translation, Michel Fayol

10. From Text to Language and Back: The Emergence of Written Language, Liliana Tolchinsky

11. Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Motivation in Writing Development, Roger H. Bruning and Douglas F. Kauffman

12. Self-Regulation and Writing: Meta-Analysis of the Self-Regulation Processes in Zimmerman and Risemberg's Model, Tanya Santangelo, Karen R. Harris, and Steve Graham

13. Relationships between Reading and Writing Development, Timothy Shanahan

III. Instruction in Writing

14. Evidence-Based Practice and Writing Instruction: A Review of Reviews, Steve Graham, Karen R. Harris, and Amber B. Chambers

15. New Developments in Genre-Based Literacy Pedagogy, David Rose

16. Writing to Learn, Perry D. Klein, Nina Arcon, and Samanta Baker

17. Sociocultural Approaches to High School Writing Instruction: Examining the Roles of Context, Positionality, and Power, Michelle Nguyen Kwok, Exequiel Ganding III, Glynda A. Hull, and Elizabeth Birr Moje

18. Instruction in Evaluation and Revision, Charles A. MacArthur

19. Grammar Instruction, Richard Hudson

20. Argumentative Writing, Ralph P. Ferretti and Yueyue Fan

21. Computer-Based Writing Instruction, Laura K. Allen, Matthew E. Jacovina, and Danielle S. McNamara

22. The Role of Professional Development for Enhancing Writing Instruction, Sarah J. McCarthey and Cristin M. Geoghegan

IV. Writing and Special Populations

23. Writing Development and Instruction for Students with Learning Disabilities: Using Diagnostic Categories to Study Writing Difficulties, Vince Connelly and Julie Dockrell

24. Writing Development and Instruction for English Language Learners, Alister Cumming

25. Teaching Writing in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms, Valerie Kinloch and Tanja Burkhard

V. Analytic Tools for Writing Research

26. Automated Writing Evaluation: An Expanding Body of Knowledge, Mark D. Shermis, Jill Burstein, Norbert Elliot, Shayne Miel, and Peter W. Foltz

27. Keystroke Logging in Writing Research: Analyzing Online Writing Processes, Luuk Van Waes, Mariëlle Leijten, Eva Lindgren, and Ása Wengelin

28. Linguistic Analysis Tools, Pablo Pirnay-Dummer

Author Index

Subject Index


About the Editors

Charles A. MacArthur, PhD, is Professor of Special Education and Literacy in the School of Education at the University of Delaware. His major research interests include writing development and instruction for struggling writers, development of self-regulated strategies, adult literacy, and applications of technology to support reading and writing. Currently he is coprincipal investigator of a research project evaluating a curriculum for college developmental writing courses based on self-regulated strategy instruction. He is coeditor of the Journal of Writing Researchand serves on the editorial boards of several other journals. Dr. MacArthur has published over 100 articles and book chapters and coedited or coauthored several books, including Best Practices in Writing Instruction, Second Edition; Handbook of Writing Research, Second Edition; and Developing Strategic Writers through Genre Instruction.

Steve Graham, EdD, is the Warner Professor in the Division of Educational Leadership and Innovation at Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, Arizona State University. He is also Research Professor in the Learning Science Institute at the Australian Catholic University in Brisbane. Dr. Graham is editor of the Journal of Educational Psychology. He has coedited several books, including Handbook of Writing Research, Second Edition; Handbook of Learning Disabilities, Second Edition; and Best Practices in Writing Instruction, Second Edition; and is the coauthor of three influential Carnegie Corporation reports: Writing Next, Writing to Read, and Informing Writing. Dr. Graham has received numerous awards, including the Career Research Award from the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), the Kauffman–Hallahan Distinguished Researcher Award from the CEC Division of Research, the Samuel A. Kirk Award from the CEC Division of Learning Disabilities, the Distinguished Researcher Award from the special education interest group of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), and the Wiederholt Distinguished Lecturer Award from the Council of Learning Disabilities. He is a fellow of the AERA and the International Academy for Research in Learning Disabilities.

Jill Fitzgerald, PhD, is Research Professor and Professor Emerita at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A former primary-grades teacher and reading specialist, she conducts research on literacy issues for multilingual learners, understanding text complexity, and vocabulary measurement. Dr. Fitzgerald is a member of the Reading Hall of Fame, a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), and a recipient of research awards from Phi Delta Kappa, the International Reading Association, and the AERA. With more than 100 publications, she is associate editor of the Journal of Educational Psychology and serves on the editorial boards of several other journals.She has also been a review panelist for the Office of Education, the Institute of Education, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Institute for Literacy.

Contributors

Laura K. Allen, MA, Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona

Nina Arcon, BA, Faculty of Education, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

Samanta Baker, BA, Faculty of Education, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

Charles Bazerman, PhD, Department of Education, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California

Richard Beach, PhD, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Virginia Berninger, PhD, Educational Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

Roger H. Bruning, PhD, Educational Psychology, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska

Tanja Burkhard, MA, College of Education and Human Ecology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio

Jill Burstein, PhD, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey

Amber B. Chambers, MEd, Learning, Literacies, and Technology, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona

Vince Connelly, PhD, Department of Psychology, Social Work and Public Health, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom

Julie A. Corrigan, BA, Department of Education, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Alister Cumming, PhD, Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Julie Dockrell, PhD, Department of Psychology and Human Development, University College London, London, United Kingdom

Norbert Elliot, PhD, Department of Humanities, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey

Yueyue Fan, BA, School of Education, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware

Michel Fayol, PhD, Social and Cognitive Psychology Department, Blaise Pascal University of Clermont Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France

Ralph P. Ferretti, PhD, School of Education, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware

Jill Fitzgerald, PhD, School of Education, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Peter W. Foltz, PhD, Pearson Knowledge Technologies, Boulder, Colorado

Exequiel Ganding III, MA, Language, Literacy, and Culture, Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California

Cristin M. Geoghegan, MA, Curriculum and Instruction, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Champaign, Illinois

Steve Graham, EdD, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona

Karen R. Harris, EdD, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona

Jennifer Higgs, MS, Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California

Richard Hudson, PhD, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, London, United Kingdom

Glynda A. Hull, PhD, Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California

Matthew E. Jacovina, PhD, Learning Sciences Institute, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona

Karin H. James, PhD, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana

R. Joanne Jao, BS, BA, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana

Douglas F. Kauffman, PhD, Department of Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts

Valerie Kinloch, PhD, College of Education and Human Ecology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio

Perry D. Klein, PhD, Faculty of Education, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

Michelle Nguyen Kwok, MA, School of Education, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Mariëlle Leijten, PhD, Department of Management, University of Antwerp, and Research Foundation Flanders (FWO), Antwerp, Belgium

Donald J. Leu, PhD, Professor of Education, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut

Eva Lindgren, PhD, Department of Language Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden

Charles A. MacArthur, PhD, School of Education, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware

Sarah J. McCarthey, PhD, Curriculum and Instruction, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Champaign, Illinois

Danielle S. McNamara, PhD, Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona

Shayne Miel, BS, Turnitin, LLC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Elizabeth Birr Moje, PhD, School of Education, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

George E. Newell, PhD, College of Education and Human Ecology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio

Pablo Pirnay-Dummer, PhD, Department of Educational Science, Martin Luther University, Halle-Wittenberg, Germany

Gert Rijlaarsdam, PhD, Research Institute of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium

David Rose, PhD, Department of Linguistics, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia

Tanya Santangelo, PhD, School of Education, Arcadia University, Glenside, Pennsylvania

Katherine Schultz, PhD, School of Education, Mills College, Oakland, California

Timothy Shanahan, PhD, College of Education, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

Mark D. Shermis, PhD, School of Education, University of Houston–Clear Lake, Houston, Texas

David Slomp, PhD, Department of Education, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada

Liliana Tolchinsky, PhD, Department of General Linguistics, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

Mark Torrance, PhD, School of Social Sciences, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom

Huub van den Bergh, PhD, Department of Language, Literature and Communication (Dutch), Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands

Jennifer VanDerHeide, PhD, Teacher Education, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan

Elke van Steendam, PhD, Faculty of Arts, KULeuven, Brussels, Belgium

Luuk Van Waes, PhD, Department of Management, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium

Åsa Wengelin, PhD, Department of Swedish, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden

Lisa Zawilinski, PhD, Department of Education, University of Hartford, West Hartford, Connecticut

Audience

Teacher educators, researchers, K–12 classroom teachers, graduate students in education.

Course Use

Serves as a text in graduate-level courses on writing instruction.
Previous editions published by Guilford:

First Edition, © 2006
ISBN: 9781593857509
New to this edition: