Teaching Advanced Literacy Skills

A Guide for Leaders in Linguistically Diverse Schools

Nonie K. Lesaux, Emily Phillips Galloway, and Sky H. Marietta

HardcoverPaperbacke-bookprint + e-book
Hardcover
August 1, 2016
ISBN 9781462526475
Price: $84.00
196 Pages
Size: 7" x 10"
order
Paperback
August 2, 2016
ISBN 9781462526468
Price: $34.00
196 Pages
Size: 7" x 10"
order
e-book
July 11, 2016
ePub and PDF ?
Price: $34.00
196 Pages
order
print + e-book
Paperback + e-Book (ePub and PDF) ?
Price: $68.00 $37.40
196 Pages
order

The reproducible materials can be downloaded and printed in PDF format.
Nonie K. Lesaux, PhD, is the Juliana W. and William Foss Thompson Professor of Education and Society at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her developmental and experimental research on school-age children and youth investigates language, reading, and social–emotional development; classroom quality and academic growth; and strategies for accelerating language and reading comprehension. With Stephanie M. Jones, Dr. Lesaux is also codirector of the Saul Zaentz Early Education Initiative and coprincipal investigator of the Early Learning Study at Harvard. She is a recipient of the William T. Grant Scholars Award and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. Dr. Lesaux has served on the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council’s Committee on the Science of Children Birth to Age 8.

Emily Phillips Galloway, EdD, is Assistant Professor at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of Education and Human Development. Inspired by her work as a former middle school reading specialist and English language arts teacher, Dr. Galloway conducts research on the development of the language skills that support advanced literacy in struggling readers and in linguistically diverse adolescents. In addition, she works with large urban districts, school leaders, and educators to design literacy improvement efforts and assessment systems.

Sky H. Marietta, EdD, is the Curriculum and Instruction Specialist at Pine Mountain Settlement School, a not-for-profit organization focused on improving opportunities for children in Appalachia, and a research fellow at Berea College. Previously, she was a postdoctoral fellow and lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her work examines connections among language, culture, poverty, and reading achievement, with a special emphasis on rural populations and science literacy. A former elementary teacher, Dr. Marietta has worked with numerous teachers and districts on implementing efficient and informative literacy assessment systems. She is coauthor with Nonie K. Lesaux of Making Assessment Matter.